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 Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

  • Topic: Continuing education requirements
  • Field: Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture
  • Professions: State-licensed/registered design professionals and members of professional organization such as: AIA, ASID, IIDA, NKBA, USBGC, etc.
  • Region: US
  • Published by: Design Arts Seminars, Inc., provider of accredited continuing education since 1992.
  • 1.800.264.9605
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Georgia Interior Design Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  

GAThe Georgia State Board of Architects and Interior Designers requires Georgia-registered interior designers to complete twelve (12) hours of continuing education every two years.
  • CE Requirement:  Twelve (12) PDUs (Professional Development Units), of which at least six (6) must be in public protection subjects (HSW). The remaining six (6) credits may be earned in related practice subjects (non HSW).
  • CE Cycle: Two-year period running from April 1 of odd-numbered years through March 31 of the following odd-numbered year (e.g. April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2013).
  • Acceptable Coursework: Continuing education hours must be AIA and/or IDCEC-approved and acquired via stuctured educational activities (i.e. seminar, internet or correspondence course). Use your professional judgment to determine if an activity meets the Board's criteria as summarized in this post and - most importantly - as detailed on Board's website (see "Source" at the end of this post for weblink). 
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers CANNOT report continuing education credits earned to the Georgia Board, neither can registrants (except in case of audit - see "audit" below).
  • Tracking of Credits: Registrants are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least four years. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of registrants will be selected for an in-depth audit to verify compliance with continuing education requirements.
Source: Georgia State Board of Architects and Interior Designers

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

For a list of continuing education opportunities, please visit Design Arts Seminars' calendar of events.

Georgia Architecture Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  

Alabama Flag The Georgia State Board of Architects and Interior Designers requires Georgia-registered architects to complete twenty-four (24) hours of continuing education every two years.
  • CE Requirement:  Twenty-four (24) PDUs (Professional Development Units), of which sixteen (16) must be in public protection subjects (HSW) and acquired via stuctured educational activities (i.e. seminar, internet or correspondence course). The remaining eight (8) credits may be earned in related practice subjects (non-HSW) via stuctured educational activities and/or earned in public protection subjects (HSW) via individually planned education activities (activity related to the registrant's profession but not designed and systematically presented as a continuing education activity e.g. publication of an article or book, making a professional or technical presentation, being an active member or officer of professional organization, teaching, etc).
  • CE Cycle: Two-year period running from July 1 of odd-numbered years through June 30 of the following odd-numbered year (e.g. July 1, 2009 through June 30, 2011 then July 1, 2011 through June 30, 2013).
  • Acceptable Coursework: Use your professional judgment to determine if an activity meets the Board's criteria as summarized in this post and - most importantly - as detailed on Board's website (see "Source" at the end of this post for weblink). 
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers CANNOT report continuing education credits earned to the Georgia Board, neither can registrants (except in case of audit - see "audit" below).
  • Tracking of Credits: Registrants are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least four years. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of registrants will be selected for an in-depth audit to verify compliance with continuing education requirements.
Source: Georgia State Board of Architects and Interior Designers

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

For a list of continuing education opportunities, please visit Design Arts Seminars' calendar of events.

 

Alabama Interior Design Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  

Alabama FlagThe Alabama Board for Registered Interior Designers requires Alabama-registered interior designers to complete ten (10) hours of continuing education every year.
  • CE Requirement:  Ten (10) CEUs (Continuing Education Units) annually (see "CE Cycle" below). All ten (10) CEUs must qualify as Health, Safety & Welfare (HSW) credits. At least four (4) of the ten (10) credits must be related to codes and standards (i.e. ADA, ANSI, BOCA, ICC, LEED, etc). 
  • CE Cycle: Annual - from October 1 to September 30.
  • Acceptable CourseworkAt least six (6) of the ten (10) hours must be earned via in-person study (i.e. face-to-face seminars and presentations) and a maximum of four (4) hours may be earned in self-directed setting (i.e. home study, online, correspondence, etc). The Alabama Board does not pre-approve providers of continuing education. Choose continuing education activities for which you will receive a certificate of completion showing verifiable course information (AIA, ASID, IIDA, IDCEC, USGBC, etc. course number). Use your professional judgment to determine if an activity meets the Board's criteria as summarized in this post and - most importantly - as detailed on Board's website (see "Source" at the end of this post for weblink). Registrants have the option to request prior written approval of a proposed CEU at least 6 weeks in advance of the scheduled activity.
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers CANNOT report continuing education credits earned to the Alabama Board. However, registrants - as part of the annual renewal process - MUST complete the continuing education section of the annual renewal form attesting to the fulfillment of all continuing education requirements. 
  • Tracking of Credits: Members are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least two years from the renewal date for which they were claimed. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of registrants may be selected for an in-depth audit to verify compliance with continuing education requirements.
Source: Alabama Board for Registered Interior Designers

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

For a list of continuing education opportunities, please visit Design Arts Seminars' calendar of events.

Alabama Architecture Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  

Alabama Flag The Alabama Board of Architects requires Alabama-registered architects to complete 12 (twelve) hours of continuing education every year.
  • CE Requirement:  Twelve (12) CEHs (Continuing Education Hours) annually (see "CE Cycle" below). All twelve (12) CEHs must qualify as Health, Safety & Welfare (HSW) credits. 
  • CE Cycle: Annual - from October 1 to September 30.
  • Acceptable Coursework: At least eight (8) of the twelve (12) hours must be earned structured study (i.e. seminar, internet or correspondence course) and a maximum of four (4) hours may be earned in self-directed setting (activity related to the registrant's profession but not designed and systematically presented as a continuing education activity e.g. publication of an article or book, making a professional or technical presentation, being an active member or officer of professional organization, teaching, etc.). The Alabama Board does not pre-approve providers of continuing education. Choose continuing education activities for which you will receive a certificate of completion showing verifiable course information (AIA, USGBC course number, etc). Use your professional judgment to determine if an activity meets the Board's criteria as summarized in this post and - most importantly - as detailed on Board's website (see "Source" at the end of this post for weblink). 
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers CANNOT report continuing education credits earned to the Alabama Board. However, registrants - as part of the annual renewal process - MUST complete the Continuing Education Annual Report Form attesting to the fulfillment of all continuing education requirements. 
  • Tracking of Credits: Members are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least one year from the renewal date for which they were claimed. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of registrants will be selected for an in-depth audit to verify compliance with continuing education requirements.
Source: Alabama Board of Architects

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

For a list of continuing education opportunities, please visit Design Arts Seminars' calendar of events.

Texas Interior Design, Architecture & Landscape Architecture Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  
TexasThe Texas Board of Architectural Examiners requires Texas-registered interior designers, archtiects and landscape architects to complete 12 (twelve) hours of continuing education every year.
  • CE Requirement:  Twelve (12) CEPHs (Continuing Education Program Hours) annually (see "CE Cycle" below). All twelve (12) CEPHs must qualify as Health, Safety & Welfare (HSW) credits. At least one (1) of the twelve hours must be related to barrier-free design () and at least one (1) must be related to sustainable or energy-efficient design ()
  • CE Cycle: Calendar year
  • Acceptable Coursework: The Texas Board does not pre-approve courses or providers of continuing education. Use your professional judgment to determine if an activity meets the Board's criteria as summarized in this post and - most importantly - as detailed on Board's website (see "Source" at the end of this post for weblink).
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers CANNOT report continuing education credits earned to the Texas Board, neither can registrants (except in case of audit - see "audit" below).
  • Tracking of Credits: Members are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least five years from date of completion. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of registrants will be audited. If audited (and only if audited), registrants will be asked to produce proof of compliance in the form of a CEPH log and corresponding certificate of continuing education or transcript showing courses completed.

Source: Texas Board of Architectural Examiners

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

For a list of continuing education opportunities, please visit Design Arts Seminars' calendar of events.

 

Florida Interior Design & Architecture Continuing Education Requirements

  
  
  
  
  
  

Florida FlagThe Florida Board of Interior Design and Architecture requires licensees to meet mandatory continuing education requirements every two years.

  • Architects' CE Requirement: 24 (twenty four) HSW (Health, Safety & Welfare) Continuing Education Credits, of which 2 (two) Advanced Florida Building Code credits (as part of the 24 HSW credits).
  • Interior Designers' CE Requirement: 20 (twenty) Continuing Education Credits, of which 16 (sixteen) must be HSW (Health, Safety & Welfare) including 2 (two) Advanced Florida Building Code credits (as part of the 16 HSW credits).
  • CE Cycle: While the license renewal deadline is the same for interior designers and architects (February 28 of odd-numbered years), the two-year period during which credits must be earned varies per profession: Interior designers must earn the required credits in the two-year period running from March 1 of odd-numbered years through February 28 of the following odd-numbered year (e.g. March 1, 2011 through February 28, 2013 for the February 28, 2013 renewal and March 1, 2013 through February 28, 2015 for the February 28, 2015 renewal). Architects must earn the required credits in the two calendar years preceeding the license renewal (January 1, 2013 through December 31, 2014 for the February 28, 2015 renewal).
  • Acceptable Coursework: Courses should be approved by one of the following:
  1. The Florida Board of Interior Design and Architecture, which approves courses under one of three designations:  REL/HSW (Related to Health, Safety & Welfare), O (Optional) and Advanced FBC (Advanced Florida Building Code, which also counts as REL/HSW).
  2. The IDCEC, which approves courses under one of three designations: HS (Health & Safety), W (Welfare) and G (General).
  3. The AIA, which allows courses to be registered under one of three designations: LU/HW (Health, Safety & Welfare) and LU (non HSW equivalent to optional or general credits)
    Tip: If you hold a professional membership (AIA, ASID, IIDA) and/or multiple state-issued interior design or architecture license or registration, you can claim credits toward both provided the course is duly approved.
  • Reporting of Credits:  Providers are NOT required to report continuing education credits earned to the Florida Board but have the OPTION to report credits earned by taking a course approved directly by the Board. Credits earned by taking a course approved by the AIA and/or IDCEC (which are automatically accepted for credits by the Board, but have no Board-issued course number) cannot be reported nor manually entered into the Board's computer system. For details, see notice on DBPR's website.  
  • Tracking of Credits: Members are responsible for maintaining proof of successful completion of continuing education activities for at least four years from date of completion. Did you know? Design Arts Seminars keeps track of the courses you take with us and provides you with online access to your transcript saving you both time and money, especially in case of audit.
  • Audit: A random sample of Florida licensees will be audited. If audited (and only if audited), members will be asked to produce proof of compliance (certificate of continuing education or transcript showing courses completed during the reporting period.)

Source: Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation

Post comments or questions on this blog or contact Design Arts Seminars, Inc.

Browse FL Continuing Education Offerings

Design Arts Seminars, Inc. | 1.800.264.9605

 

5 Steps to Attracting More Clients

  
  
  
  
  
  
5 Steps to Attracting More Clients

As mentioned in an earlier tweet, I (and 400 others) attended a conference call with Nika Stewart and Sydni Craig-Hart. During the hour-long call, the two successful businesswomen outlined five steps design professionals should take to attract more clients.

Here we go (my favorite is under # 4 but you need to implement all 5 to reap the benefits of the synergy):

1) Discover Your True Value

  • What do you bring to the table? What sets you apart?
  • What is your expertise? What is your niche market?
  • Who do you serve? Who is your ideal client?

I suggest jotting down answers to these questions on a piece on paper. Don't over think it. The tricky part here is that it is a bit counterintuitive, you might think that the more you include the better. Well, no. The more you zoom in on what you are best at, the better. Think of it as doing a search on Google. If you type "Continuing Education", you will end up with results for any and all type of continuing education services, most of which will not be a good match for you. On the other hand, if you searched for "accredited continuing education seminars for interior designers", you will get a lot less results but they will be much more pertinent. Same goes for your clients.

2) Communicate Your Unique Brand

Once you have completed item 1 above, you need to phrase it out so you can communicate on it while in the elevator or while at networking event. Think of it as a marketing "speed dating" of sorts.
Sydni suggested answering two questions in one brief sentence:

  • What do you do?
  • Who do you do it for?
Example 1: I am an interior designer working on commercial, residential, hospitality and healthcare projects. (a no-no)
Example 2: I help busy parents create the eco-friendly master bedroom suite retreat they need. (Yes, much better)

If I were a busy parent (your ideal client) and you introduced yourself to me as in example 2, I would identify with your offer and probably want to continue a conversation with you or I might check out your website or blog for ideas and possibly hire you. On the other hand, if you introduced yourself to me as in example 1, I may not connect the dots (I don't see myself as a residential or commercial project) so I may not realize that you could help me solve the need I have for a "get away" in my own home.

3) Create Irresistible Marketing Material
Beyond stating the obvious (having a polished, clean and professional business card, website, letterhead, note cards and envelopes created) Sydni recommended:
  • Creating "structured packages" that fits your prospects' needs and outline the value, benefits and price.
  • Showcase your work on your website or blog. "Tell a story" as Sydni puts it. I think she is right on. We are now in what is referred to as the "experience economy". Part of what you deliver is an "experience". The magic starts with you then carries throughout your office, your website, portfolio, blog, etc.
  • Use audio and video testimonials. It has never been easier to record snippet of conversation or record short video clips. It's so much more engaging. Not sure how, ask someone who does. You will be surprised how easy it is! Not ready for that, take pictures!
I wanted to add a tip of my own, if you need the polished business cards, etc. Do your self a favor and visit crowdsrpring.com and post your project there. You will be amazed the number of talented graphic designers on that website.

4) Create a Marketing Plan
  • Set clear goals
  • Create the plan
  • Work the plan to consistently and effectively market your business
  • Here is my favorite: Partner with local businesses that offer services that complements (not competes with) yours. For instance, a professional organizer, a high-end real estate agent, a lawn maintenance service, why not private chefs, CPAs, etc. The idea is that each professional in the "partnership" becomes a resource for their clients, who turn into leads for your business. Say a professional organizer hears her client complain about her kitchen. She might suggest contacting you for her interior design needs. You may get the job and the client might suggest she is re-doing the kitchen because they plan on selling soon. You may suggest the real estate agent in the "partnership". You get the idea. This costs nothing to any of the "trusted" partners. There is no sales pitch involved, it is just dropping the right name at the right time. It is something you probably already do, why not formalize the process and benefit from it! I have been wondering who we could partner with...

5) Adjust Your Mindset
All the strategies and tools in the world won't help you unless you "break through your fears" as Sydni puts it. I loved the acronym she mentioned: FEAR stands for "False Expectation Appearing Real" . Bottom line:
  • We all have fears, often unfounded
  • Take "can't" out of your vocabulary.
  • Why can't you anyway?
  • Create a support system: work with a coach or with like-minded people.


The Po!nt: In their ""emergency intervention call", Sydni and Nika articulated 5 ideas they guaranteed would help your business grow. Admittedly, "nothing new" but they made some very valid points. These are very actionable tips, read them, decide which to tackle first (or revisit if it is something you already do), come up with a plan for all 5 items and stick to it. Need more marketing inspiration, check out our own marketing tips on our DNA blog and post your questions. You may also want to visit Nika's and Sydni's websites. They also run a virtual marketing "boot camp" for design professionals that you might want to look into (not sure what it is worth to you but it costs $297. FYI, Design Arts Seminars, Inc. is not affiliated with and does not benefit from the bootcamp Sydni and Nika run.).

Don't be shy, we would love hear from you! Post your questions or comments.

 

Continuing Education: What's The Point?

  
  
  
  
  
  
What the point?

Let's face it; I rarely get to hear how wonderful continuing education is. I don't take it personally and I don't think anyone else at Design Arts Seminars does either. For the most part, it simply has nothing to do with the quality of the continuing education opportunities available. There are many quality programs available out there to fit any schedule and any budget (okay, there are also some very bad ones but you know what they are so they can easily be avoided). For one thing, I like to think that we offer quality continuing education programs in a variety of delivery formats for a reasonable fee. I am biased on that one but the evaluations our attendees turn in seem to prove me right but that's not the point. So what is the issue with continuing education? Why is it perceived as a costly, time-consuming inconvenience rather than as the opportunity it really is? 

Why don't more people think like Al Stevens: "You need to start looking at continuing education as an investment into yourself. It is interesting that people completely understand the importance of changing oil in the car in order to keep the car running at peak performance. No one in their right mind would find it acceptable to go 10 years without an oil change and expect their vehicle to perform at peak levels. Why would you expect your place of employment to be any different?" 

Maybe it is the fact that it is "mandatory" for most licensed design professionals and even for those holding a professional membership. Maybe it is because of the cost (in both time and/or money) associated with it. Whatever your reason for dreading continuing education, it is time to rethink it and here is why:

 

  1. You stay abreast of the latest developments in your industry by learning from professionals in their area of expertise. 
  2. You stay ahead of the curve or at least, stay in the race. 
  3. You get an opportunity to network with your peers. 
  4. You use it as a source of inspiration for your next project, your next story or - why not - your next blog post!
  5. You remain marketable. Don't just take continuing education credits because you have to. List completed courses on your résumé and on your website for your clients to see. 
The po!nt: It is all about you and what's in it for you. Celebrate continuing education (It's probably good karma anyway). Look forward to it. Make the most it: Talk, blog, write about it. Then reap the benefits! Already know it all? Then teach a continuing education course, increase your exposure and establish yourself as an expert in your field. 
 
Continuing Education Opportunities: www.designarts.net 

 

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